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Our home page represents one of over 135 pages of this site and provides visitors with an introduction to what we offer here. It also provides connectivity to interactive content, giving a better educational overview of what the Christian faith is all about.

The presentation of this website presents spiritual Christian concepts in a biblical and conceptual way about the creator God to anyone with an interest in their spiritual life, or anyone who seeks answers to questions along their spiritual journey.

Reference Christian Eternal Theological Concepts is a website presented from a biblicist viewpoint, and is not representing any church denomination’s interpretation of the Scriptures, or from a religious cult–defined as teaching one person’s private interpretation of the Scriptures. We consider these concepts or views agreeing with a Christian Orthodox view; A view historically in line with the teachings of God the Father and his Prophets, and God the Son, Jesus Christ, and his Apostles, as written in the original Scriptures.

EXPLANATION OF FEATURES ON THIS SITE

We designed our website for non-believers, new Christians, and seasoned Christians functioning at any stage in life, to include those Christians working toward a degree or advanced degrees in Bible or Theology. Depending on where you are in your spiritual journey, we leave you the following information about this website, as listed on our menu bar above:

  • Doctrinal Studies Index—Bible studies written for non-believers and new Christians.
  • Word Study Index—Written in Bible Encyclopedia format for a better understanding.
  • Essay Index—A deeper study using Christian concepts for those looking for more.
  • Education Index–Christian educational resources for Christian individuals and churches.
  • Interactive Links—Designed to bring interactive links for everyday use of our visitors.
  • Stay Informed Page—Providing website and news links from multiple sources, on multiple topics, from conservative perspectives. (Found Under “Interactive Links” tab above.)
  • RCETC Magazine—is our single continuous running magazine, with articles added from time to time, comprising of Christian guest writers and Christian reprint articles from Christian authors, as posted on FaithWriters.com.

OTHER FEATURES

  • For the convenience of those looking for a way to read the Bible in their own language, RCETC makes available the link: Biblis.com, and can be found on our “Interactive Link” page.
  • And for those that want to hear the Scriptures read in their own language, we make available the audio Bible provided by “Talking Bibles”, located under the “Interactive Links” tab above.
  • Our RECIPROCAL LINKS Directory offers link connectivity to many Christian Ministry websites worldwide and can be accessed through clicking on “Interactive links” on the menu bar above.

This website is simple to get around on and if you have any comments or questions, contact us. I hope that this Christian website will be informative and helpful in your search for the truth in your spiritual journey. If you have questions about the Christian Faith or its biblical doctrines on any level, ask your questions using our “Contact Us” form.

John 6:35—Jesus said to them, “I am the bread of life; he who comes to Me shall not hunger, and he who believes in Me shall never thirst.” (NASB)



VIDEO PRESENTATIONS FOR OUR VISITORS


Strength Rejoices in the Challenge



 


CHRISTIAN DEVOTIONAL FEED

Our Daily Bread Devotional

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  • Heart of Service
    by Bill Crowder on June 15, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    When my “uncle” Emory passed away, the tributes were many and varied. Yet all those honors carried a consistent theme—Emory showed his love for God by serving others. Nowhere was this more exemplified than during his World War II military service, where he served as a corpsman—a medic who went into battle without a weapon. He received high military honors for his bravery, but Emory was most remembered for his compassionate service, both during and after the war.   Emory’s selflessness lived out Paul’s challenge to the Galatians. He wrote, “You, my brothers and sisters, were called to be free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the flesh; rather, serve one another humbly in love” (Galatians 5:13). But how? In our brokenness, we’re hardwired to put self first, rather than others, so where does this unnatural selflessness come from? In Philippians 2:5, Paul offers this encouragement: “In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus.” Paul describes Christ’s willingness to even experience death on a cross out of His great love for us. Only as His Spirit produces the mind of Christ in us are we set apart and enabled to sacrifice for others—reflecting the ultimate sacrifice Jesus made when He gave Himself for us. May we yield to the Spirit’s work in us.

  • Dilemmas and Deeper Faith
    by Arthur Jackson on June 14, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    During a Saturday morning Bible study, a father was perplexed because his beloved, wayward daughter had returned to the city, but he was uncomfortable with her in his home because of her behavior. Another attendee was not well in her body. The physical and medicinal effects of long-term disease and aging had taken their toll. Numerous visits to numerous doctors had yielded minimal progress. She was discouraged. By divine design, Mark chapter 5 was the Bible passage they studied that day. And when the study was over, hope and joy were palpable. In Mark 5:23, Jairus, a father with a sick child, exclaimed, “My little daughter is dying.” On His way to visit the girl, Jesus healed an unnamed woman of her long-term health issue, saying, “Daughter, your faith has healed you” (v. 34). Jairus and the woman, compelled by faith in Jesus, sought Him out and they weren’t disappointed. But in both cases, prior to meeting Jesus, things had progressed from “bad to worse” before getting better. Life’s dilemmas don’t discriminate. Regardless of gender or age, race or class, we all face situations that perplex us and send us searching for answers. Rather than allowing challenges to keep us from Jesus, let’s strive to have them stir us to deeper faith in the One who feels it when we touch Him (v. 30) and who can make us well.

  • Expecting Jesus
    by Cindy Hess Kasper on June 13, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    My friend Paul was awaiting the arrival of a technician to repair his refrigerator when he saw a text on his phone from the appliance company. It read: Jesus is on his way and is expected to arrive at approximately 11:35 a.m. Paul soon discovered the technician’s name was indeed Jesús (hay-soos). But when can we expect Jesus the Son of God to arrive? When He came as a man two thousand years ago and suffered the penalty of our sin, He said that He would be back—but only the Father knew the precise “day or hour” of His return (Matthew 24:36). What difference might it make in our day-to-day priorities if we did know the moment our Savior is coming back to earth? (John 14:1–3). Jesus cautioned us to be ready for His return: “The Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him” (Matthew 24:44). He reminded us to  “keep watch, because you do not know on which day your Lord will come” (v. 42). On the day of Christ’s return, we won’t get an alert on our phone to give us a heads up. So, through the power of the Spirit working through us, let’s live each day with a perspective of eternity, serving God and taking advantage of every opportunity to share His message of love and hope with others.

  • God’s Created Masterpiece
    by Marvin Williams on June 12, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    Although neuroscience has made great progress in understanding how the brain works, scientist admit they’re still in the early stages of understanding it. They understand brain architecture, some aspects of its function, and regions that respond to environment, activate our senses, and generate movements and contain emotions. But they still can’t figure out how all these interactions contribute to behavior, perception, and memory. God’s incredibly complex, created masterpiece—humanity—is still mysterious. David acknowledged the marvels of the human body. Using figurative language, he celebrated God’s power, evidenced by His sovereign control over the entire natural process of humans “being knit . . . together in [his] mother’s womb” (Psalm 139:13). He wrote, “I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful” (v. 14). The ancients viewed the development of a child inside the mother’s womb as a great mystery (see Ecclesiastes 11:5). Even with limited knowledge of the marvelous complexities of the human body, David still stood in awe and wonder of God’s amazing work and presence (Psalm 139:17-18). The marvelous and wonderful complexity of the human body reflects the power and sovereignty of our great God. Our only responses can be praise, awe, and wonder!

  • Shebna’s Grave
    by Tim Gustafson on June 11, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    Irish poet W. B. Yeats wanted to be buried “Under Ben Bulben,” a stately mountain after which he titled one of his last poems. The poem’s final line is etched onto his gravestone: Cast a cold eye/ On life, on death./ Horseman, pass by! Much speculation has taken place over what this means. Perhaps it’s the poet’s acknowledgment of the reality of both life and death. Regardless, Yeats got his wish about where he was buried and what his gravestone would say. But the cold truth is that life goes on without us, indifferent to our departure. During a dire time in Judah’s history, Shebna, a “palace administrator,” made a tomb for himself to insure his legacy after death. But God, through His prophet Isaiah, told Shebna, “Who gave you permission to cut out a grave for yourself here, hewing your grave on the height and chiseling your resting place in the rock?” (Isaiah 22:16). The prophet told him, “[God] will roll you up tightly like a ball and throw you into a large country. There you will die” (v. 18). Shebna had missed the point. What matters isn’t where we’re buried; what matters in life is who we serve. Those who serve Jesus have this immeasurable comfort: “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord” (Revelation 14:13). We serve a God who’s never indifferent to our “departure.” He anticipates our arrival and welcomes us home.

  • Every Moment Counts
    by Xochitl Dixon on June 10, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    When the Titanic hit an iceberg in April 1912, Pastor John Harper secured a spot for his six-year-old daughter in one of the limited number of lifeboats. He gave his life-vest to a fellow passenger and shared the gospel with anyone who would listen. As the vessel sank and hundreds of people awaited an unlikely rescue, Harper swam from one person to another and said, “Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved” (Acts 16:31 kjv). During a meeting for survivors of the Titanic in Ontario, Canada, one man referred to himself as “the last convert of John Harper.” Having rejected Harper’s first invitation, the man received Christ when the preacher asked him again. He watched as Harper devoted the last moments of his life to sharing Jesus before succumbing to hypothermia and sinking below the surface of the icy water. In his charge to Timothy, the apostle Paul encourages a similar urgency and dedication to selfless evangelism. Affirming God’s constant presence and the inevitable return of Jesus, Paul charges Timothy to preach with patience and precision (2 Timothy 4:1-2). The apostle reminds the young preacher to remain focused, though some people will reject Jesus (vv. 3–5). Our days are limited, so every moment counts. Like Paul and Pastor Harper, we can be confident that our Father secured our spot in heaven as we proclaim, “Jesus saves!” (vv. 6-8).

  • Big-Hearted Giving
    by Dave Branon on June 9, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    At the after-school Bible club where my wife Sue serves once a week, the kids were asked to donate money to help children in the war-torn country of Ukraine. About a week after Sue told our eleven-year-old granddaughter Maggie about the project, we got an envelope in the mail from her. It contained $3.45, along with a note: “This is all I have for the kids in Ukraine. I’ll send more later.” Sue hadn’t suggested to Maggie that she should help, but perhaps the Spirit prompted her. And Maggie, who loves Jesus and seeks to live for Him, responded. We can learn a lot as we think of this small gift from a big heart. It mirrors some instructions about giving provided by Paul in 2 Corinthians 9. First, the apostle suggested that we should sow “generously” (v. 6). A gift of “all I have” is certainly a generous one. Paul also wrote that our gifts should be given cheerfully as God leads and as we’re able, not because we’re “under compulsion” (v. 7). And he mentioned the value of “gifts to the poor” (v. 9) by quoting Psalm 112:9. When an opportunity to give presents itself, let’s ask how God wants us to respond. When we’re generous and cheerful in directing our gifts to those in need as He leads us, we give in a way that reflects “thanksgiving to God” (2 Corinthians 9:11). That’s big-hearted giving.

  • House Gods
    by Mike Wittmer on June 8, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    The men in the Bible study group were nearly eighty years old, so I was surprised to learn they struggled with lust. A battle that had begun in their youth lingered still. Each day they pledged to follow Jesus in this area and asked forgiveness for the moments they failed. It may surprise us that godly men still fight against base temptations at a late stage in life, but maybe it shouldn’t. An idol is anything that threatens to take the place of God in our lives, and such things can show up long after we assume they’re gone. In the Bible, Jacob had been rescued from his uncle Laban and his brother Esau. He was returning to Bethel to worship God and celebrate His many blessings, yet his family still kept foreign gods that Jacob had to bury (Genesis 35:2–4). At the end of the book of Joshua, after Israel had defeated their enemies and settled in Canaan, Joshua still had to urge them to “throw away the foreign gods that are among you and yield your hearts to the Lord” (Joshua 24:23). And King David’s wife Michal apparently kept idols, for she put one in his bed to deceive the soldiers who came to kill him (1 Samuel 19:11–16). Idols are more common than we think, and God is more patient than we deserve. Temptations to turn to them will come, but God’s forgiveness is greater. May we be set apart for Jesus—turning from our sins and finding forgiveness in Him.

  • Joy in Giving
    by Alyson Kieda on June 7, 2024 at 12:00 AM

    When Keri’s young son was going through yet another muscular dystrophy-related surgery, she wanted to get her mind off her family’s situation by doing something for someone else. So she rounded up her son’s outgrown but gently used shoes and donated them to a ministry. Her giving prompted friends and family members and even neighbors to join in, and soon more than two hundred shoes were donated! Although the shoe drive was meant to bless others, Keri feels her family was blessed more. “The whole experience really lifted our spirits and helped us to focus outward.” Paul understood how important it was for followers of Jesus to give generously. On his way to Jerusalem, the apostle Paul stopped in Ephesus. He knew it would likely be his last visit with the people of the church he’d founded there. In his farewell address to the church elders, he encouraged and reminded them to continue to work diligently in service to God as he had while with them (Acts 20:17–20). Then he concluded with Jesus’ words: “It is more blessed to give than to receive” (v. 35). Jesus wants us to freely and humbly give of ourselves (Matthew 10:8; Luke 6:38). When we trust Him to guide us, He will provide opportunities for us to do so. Like Keri’s family, we may be surprised by the joy we experience as a result.

 

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